Pen Reviews Pt 2

Here is the long awaited conclusion to my Jet Pens Pen Reviews. To recap, all of these pens were generously sent to me by JetPens for the purpose of reviewing and then donating to the Putnam County Library to be used as door prizes at our summer art programs. The summer program went so well that we are actually starting up a monthly drawing club, the PCL Teen Sketch Club, the first meeting of which will be tomorrow. If you know any arty teenagers in the Cookeville, TN area, send them by!

Uni-ball Signo Gel Ink Pen

I am not normally one for ball-point pens, feeling, quite haughtily, that they are the tool of the plebian worker types, not meant for lofty and discerning artisans such as myself. (please read with a thoroughly sarcastic and snooty voice, on par with any Downton resident.) Ignoring for the moment how blatantly idiotic such an opinion is, the Uni-ball Signo does a great job of bridging the gap between Mundane and Artsy pens. It has a nice feel in the hand, with a comfortable rubber grip and a suitable amount of weight. The .38 tip on this was thoroughly fine, allowing me to drop some very delicate lines. And the ink flow was wonderful, no noticeable globbing or skipping. The ink itself is a very nice black, and while I did not test it myself, claims to be water-proof.

 

All in all, if an Ink Artist should ever have to demean himself so much as to use a Writing utensil for Drawing, he could hope for no better than the Uni-ball Signo.

 

Sakura Pigma Micron Marker Pens

Sakura Microns were some of the first art pens I ever chose for myself. I greatly enjoyed how they have such uniform width on lines, but also come in such a wide variety of sizes. They can be a great tool for an artist just learning to play with line widths.

This set was an entirely different experience, with 6 pens in a variety of colors, at the same width. I am a creature of habit, almost exclusively inking in the jettest jet black inks I can find, so it was out of the box for me to play around with drawing, and not coloring, in reds and greens and blues. The pens themselves hold up well, as they always have. I know from experience that the nice felt tips will slowly wear to a bit of a point over time, and the labeling on the barrel will most likely rub off a bit, but this just shows your touch on the pen. These are made to be disposable pens, which they certainly are, but at $2-3 for singles, that’s not such a bad thing. The inks are consistent in color, and have a really steady flow, with no noticeable bleed, and the different colors are nice and vibrant.

While these would be poorly served as a coloring tool, I think they would work splendidly for anyone wanting to play around with sketching and doodling in a variety of hues.

 

 

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